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Thread: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

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    Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    VINTAGE GUITAR MAGAZINE - November 1998

    By John J. Slog

    Billy Cox played bass with Jimi Hendrix in his earliest early years and served with him in the Army. This interview was done to get a feeling of the way it was from a firsthand source in both Band of Gypsys conglomerations and in the Jimi Hendrix Experience after the departure of Noel Redding.

    Many consider Cox the ultimate bandmate and bass player because of his relentless pursuit of the solid groove, be it in the skeletal ground floor or doubling guitar runs to add the low octave to the already massive reeling soundscape of the legendary guitarist's guitarist.
    When the chips were down, Hendrix knew he could rely on the rocksolid Cox, onstage and in his personal life. A strong bond and mutual trust permeated their lives as sex, drugs, and rock and roll became the anthem. And above all the madness of touring, recording, and being in the biggest social circles, Cox retained his loyalty. To this day, he remains a down-to-earth and genuinely nice guy; the kind of friend everyone should have.

    VG: In 1970, could you have realized how big the legacy of Jimi Hendrix would be, and that 28 years later an international magazine wold be asking about it?

    BC: No. We were playing with friends and just enjoying the music. As I look back, it's incredible the music we laid down 27, 28 years ago still sounds fresh.

    VG: When did you start on bass and what players were your early influences?

    BC: I played bass in high school. Paul Chambers, Charles Mingus, and Ray Brown were my early influences because at that time the electric bass was not a big factor, there weren't a lot of musicians who played it. I think the first electric bass I heard was in Lloyd Price's band. The first electric bass I owned I bought in Ft. Campbell.

    VG: Do you recall what it was?

    BC: I think it was a Danelectro.

    VG: Did James Jamerson do anything for you? His strong pocket technique reminds me of your style.

    BC: Yeah. That was later. In the '60s he was one of the dominant bass players on a lot of Motown records. He was very good.

    VG: Jimi was a gearhead. Did you have a lot of basses at the time?

    BC: No. But I think Fender sent Jimi 10 or 12 guitars at a time. Every couple months they were sending guitars, so he wound up with a lot of them.

    VG: You used a Fender Jazz in the studio and a Precision Bass for live shows. Why did you differentiate?

    BC: Well I aways rigged my bases up the years.

    VG: What amps did you use with Hendrix, Marshall or Sunn?

    BC: With Jimi, Marshalls.

    VG: What was it like onstage with the volume and all those stacks?

    BC: Deafening, but that was our way. At that point we were not politicians, we weren't advocates. But we were musicians. So I think we rebelled in our own way, through words and volume. That was our way of rebelling at the time because there were a lot of things that just weren't right - things we thought we should have a word in. But due to the fact we weren't advocates or politicians, we stayed out of that arena. We did our music and raised eyebrows.

    VG: Did you use any effects?

    BC: At times it was necessary. I think on songs like ''Dolly Dagger" I used a lot of fuzz and on 'Them Changes" I used a light fuzz. At that time, you're talking almost 30years ago, there weren't many effects for the bass. So we improvised and experimented to make different
    and I think I put more rigging on my Precision than I did the Jazz. At the time, I had
    nickel-wrapped strings on the studio bass and regular steel on the one I used for live gigs. But sometimes I'd switch.

    VG: Did you do any electronic changes?

    BC: Maybe potentiometers and shielding. A fellow in town named Gerald Brown did a lot of rigging and working on my basses, and we'd experiment with them.

    VG: Did you like a high action or kind of low?

    BC: Low.

    VG: Do you remember particulars about the Fender basses you used with Hendrix; what years they were, or features?

    BC: No, I never got into that. If l picked up a bass and it feltgood, I'd play it. It was all about how it felt in my hands. There are so many guitar and bass companies in the world, I mean you go to a NAMM convention,man, there's hundreds of them all around looking alike and knocking off each other. But to tell you the truth, I never really got into nomenclatures and
    sounds appropriate for the sound we were trying to project

    VG: When recording, did you go straight into the board or did you have an amp mic'ed up?

    BC: Eddie Kramer was responsible for that. Ithink, I had a mic on my amp and a line going to the board, so I was recorded two ways. There were two pots to control the bass.

    VG: What do you remember about Eddie Kramer?

    BC: Eddie is a genius when it comes to being an engineer. He had his own technique, his own ideas, and he was adventurous. Consequently, he gave Jimi and myself and everyone who he recorded a unique sound of their own. Like I say, there were areas engineers just didn't touch and they weren't as creative as he was. He was good for what we were doing, an excellent engineer.

    VG: Jimi always mentioned your playing was very solid and rootsy. Did you lock into some drummers more than others?

    BC: No, not necessarily. People have asked me in the past, "Who's the best drummer, Mitch Mitchell or Buddy Miles." That's like trying to compare Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. You've got two different styles, but both were excellent drummers. One came from an R&B background, one from a pop and jazz background. But I enjoyed playing with both. Even today, I really get off and play very freely with both of them because they're good drummers.

    VG: Did you lock into Jimi's guitar parts?

    BC: Sometimes there were patterns we played together. There were times in the song when we'd lock in and there were times when he'd go his way, I'd go my way. But when Mitch and Jimi and myself played, Mitch would go one direction, Jimi would go another direction.
    My job was to keep it solid, keep that bottom firm.

    VG. What other rock stars were you in contact with when you were a member of the band?

    BC: Everybody . There were all kinds of parties and a lot of friends. Jimi had a lot of personal friends and all that, you know .

    VG: Did you know or play with Buddy Miles before you were asked to join him in the Band of Gypsys?

    BC: Yes, I did. Basically Jimi was under a contractual agreement to finish his tour with The Experience, and I was still in the studio doing some stuff and coming up with creative things. Buddy asked me to help with a few projects and go on the road. I did that. I worked with Buddy until Jimi was free of his contracts, then I went on with Jimi.

    VG: Do you remember appearing with Jimi on the "Tonight Show," perforrrilng "Lover Man?"

    BC: Yeah, that was good. Playing with Jimi was very fun. At that point we loved doing what we were doing, so we played a gig on the streets (in Harlem) or we jammed in an apartment or in the studio, whatever was fun. Because music, at that time in my life, was number one. I think I loved music bigger than I loved anything.

    VG: When the Gypsys, Suns, and Rainbows band was assembled before Woodstock, it must have been a lot of fun jamming with all the percussionists. What do you remember about the marathon jams?

    BC: That was with Jerry Velez on bongos, Juma Sultan on congos, Mitch Mitchell, Larry Lee on rhythm guitar, Jimi, and myself. It was fun. It was another dimension. At that time Jimi was experimenting with percussion , and it worked pretty well. But there were those who were unhappy with the faces onstage, and felt it would destroy his image in some way to have too many black faces on the stage.

    VG: Was that because the press was trying to show a tie between the Black Panthers and Jimi and things like that?

    BC: No, that had nothing to do with it. It came from the office. They wanted to keep him in the pop arena with the white audiences. And they didn't want him to cross over. At that point, he was never played on R&B stations, so the blacks really did not know who Jimi Hendrix was and what he was all about. That's what that was about.

    VG: I see. What was it like performing at Woodstock?

    BC: Woodstock was fun, but it was the first time I'd played in front of so many people! It was an ocean of people. Kind of frightening, even for Jimi. When we looked out, there were hundreds of thouands of faces. I think the motion picture Woodstock depicted us as playing when they were cleaning up or something, which was totally wrong. We played in the morning or early afternoon, and Jimi said, "Man, look at all the people there. It's like watching the television set. Look at that guy. Look at her. She doesn't have any clothes on. Look at this guy over there lighting up ajoint." Jimi said, "Let's go out here and play like we're watching television." So that'swhat we did. Kind of took our minds off the fact there were over 400 ,000 eyeballs and ears listening to what we were doing.

    VG: Was Jimi really aware of all the intricacies you and Mitch were playing, or was he more entranced, concentrating on his groove?

    BC: Basically, it was his music, and a conductor knows what's going on with his music. He was aware of it. He had confidence in everyone onstage because we'd rehearsed and everybody knew what they were supposed to do and what they were supposed to play. So he placed confidence in us.

    VG: Did he often compliment your performance?

    BC: Yeah, and I complimented him, too. And there were days when we all had bad shows [because] we were tired. But there were other days we were just knocked down by the response. We were really good together [when we] had a lot of rest before the show. So it's like any other band, you have good nights and you have a bad night.

    VG: What do you remember about the sessions with Jimi and Buddy Miles at the Record Plant Studios?

    BC: Buddy was our friend and he was cool. We just had fun playing together because we gelled. It wasn't about, "Well, here's a session for him. He reserved the time, let's get paid for this, put in this number of hours." It wasn't like that. It was getting together and saying something with our playing , from the heart and soul.

    VG: Jimi's dream was basically getting Electric Lady Studios built. Do you remember anything about that in particular?

    BC: I hung out there for days on end, to see what was going on. I handed a hammer here and a few nails there, basic help. I saw it at its creative peak. It's changed a bit now, it's quite different.

    VG: Do you recall the New Year's Eve how in '69 at the Fillmore? It was reportedly one of the band's most tight*knit performances.

    BC: Yeah, it was a good show. The people were blown away. They didn't know what to expect, three guys coming out and jamming like mad. So from the time we played our first note, people knew it was something good, something different. And we enjoyed that. And we had to do that. That gig was necessary to get Jimi out of a contractual agreement. So there we were, two friends trying to help another friend. And not only helping, but gigging and having a good time at it. You could hear it on the album.

    VG: On January 28, 1970, you played Madison Square Garden to benefit the Vietnam Moratorium Committee. It was the las't time that version of the Band of Gypsys would be together. Jimi walked offstage after a short time and later publicly denounced the Band of Gypsys and pointed the finger at Buddy Miles.

    BC: Yeah, that didn't come off too well. It's a long story. It just didn't work out, not because of the friendship, but because there were a lot of people around and some negative things happened. No fault of myself or Buddy. And Jimi was unable to do that gig because it was a deliberate act by some people. I can't point fingers, call names, but a deliberate act, because that particular group at that point in time was feared because we go back to that other reason why the group at Woodstock didn't make it. Some people felt he should be more into a white arena as opposed to being with black players and gravitating into a black arena and market.

    VG: There was talk he was getting Mitch and Noel back, but Noel didn't actually come back. He toured with Jeff Beck, then Jimi got you back in the lineup.

    BC: There was talk and rumors all the time in that group.

    VG: What do you remember from then up until Jimi 's death?

    BC: We went on the road, me, Mitch, and Jimi. Me and Mitch became friends, and we played together in order to fulfill the agreements. Jimi signed contracts, we had to do so many gigs in there, so we went along as a group and as friends just to do what we had to do. It was about business. It was about doing figures, it was about making money for us and for the management company. So we just made the best of it and had a good time. No personality conflicts, we never had one!

    VG: What field of business are you currrently involved in?

    BC: I'm doing a lot of things in addition to my music. I have a video production company and a pawn shop with a group of investors.

    Cox was an integral part of a band that changed the tides of music forever, yet he took it all in stride and to this day is humble andappreciative that destiny chose him to take part in this legendary "Experience."
    Last edited by RobbieRadio; 01-18-18 at 09:24 PM.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Interesting:

    "VG: Did you know or play with Buddy Miles before you were asked to join him in the Band of Gypsys?

    BC: Yes, I did. Basically Jimi was under a contractual agreement to finish his tour with The Experience, and I was still in the studio doing some stuff and coming up with creative things."

    Meaning Hendrix wanted to sack Redding already much earlier. Because of contractual obligations, he had to wait to the end of the tour, what was the Denver Pop Festival.

    Interesting:

    VG: When the Gypsys, Suns, and Rainbows band was assembled before Woodstock, it must have been a lot of fun jamming with all the percussionists. What do you remember about the marathon jams?

    BC: That was with Jerry Velez on bongos, Juma Sultan on congos, Mitch Mitchell, Larry Lee on rhythm guitar, Jimi, and myself. It was fun. It was another dimension. At that time Jimi was experimenting with percussion , and it worked pretty well. But there were those who were unhappy with the faces onstage, and felt it would destroy his image in some way to have too many black faces on the stage.

    VG: On January 28, 1970, you played Madison Square Garden to benefit the Vietnam Moratorium Committee. It was the las't time that version of the Band of Gypsys would be together. Jimi walked offstage after a short time and later publicly denounced the Band of Gypsys and pointed the finger at Buddy Miles.

    BC: Yeah, that didn't come off too well. It's a long story. It just didn't work out, not because of the friendship, but because there were a lot of people around and some negative things happened. No fault of myself or Buddy. And Jimi was unable to do that gig because it was a deliberate act by some people. I can't point fingers, call names, but a deliberate act, because that particular group at that point in time was feared because we go back to that other reason why the group at Woodstock didn't make it. Some people felt he should be more into a white arena as opposed to being with black players and gravitating into a black arena and market.

    This means that the Gypsy Suns, Moons and Rainbows, as well as the Band of Gypsies were ended for racial and marketing reasons by the JH management (i.e. Michael Jeffery). At least, this is how Billy Cox sees it.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    This means that the Gypsy Suns, Moons and Rainbows, as well as the Band of Gypsies were ended for racial and marketing reasons by the JH management (i.e. Michael Jeffery). At least, this is how Billy Cox sees it.
    Yes....I thought that was a well known fact

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Lucas View Post
    Yes....I thought that was a well known fact
    Hmm, not exactly, management maintains (by word of the secretary) that no decisions were made without the consent of Hendrix, implying that Hendrix himself ended the BOG. With the Chalpin case on his neck, for which the BOG seems to have been a convenient but temporary solution, this kind of argument is as plausible. I am not sure which one is the truth. As the firing of Redding shows, Hendrix is very good at keeping people in the mists about his plans.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Opinion guys, not fact.

    Same for Redding being "fired".

    I read the same things you do / post and a lot depends on how you read it and if you read it in isolation to what else has been said, written and presented over the last half a century.
    "That's the best news I ever heard" Bob Dylan

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezy Rider View Post
    At least, this is how Billy Cox sees it.
    He's changed his tune back and fore over the years Let's not forget, as the story goes, that at the end on the final Fehmarn gig everyone concerned said he was suffering from a breakdown that included paranoia.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    QUOTE=stplsd;124903]He's changed his tune back and fore over the years Let's not forget, as the story goes, that at the end on the final Fehmarn gig everyone concerned said he was suffering from a breakdown that included paranoia.[/QUOTE]

    He played well for someone so "paranoid" as Stickells claimed he had to stand beside or behind him during the remaining shows (no pictures tho) to prevent a meltdown onstage after the supposed dosing of LSD on 9/1/70. If you look at the photos at Aarhus or even KB Hallen Hendrix looks more disturbed than Cox ever did during the remainder of the European tour.
    Cox's opinion may vary due to his regard for Hendrix and potential financial gain, if he says what might be the truth he will be biting the hand that feeds him. The possible truth is Hendrix was a shitty employer (and friend) who did not stand up for his band mates this wouldn't reflect well on EH or the Saint Jimi myth they push. Cox has stayed relevant by his association with Hendrix (as Redding, Mitchell and Miles did) he is trotted out for each album, documentary or tour by EH to rekindle that "Jimi was a great soul from another universe" abstract spiel that doesn't actually enlighten or reveal answers to questions fans have about how they created music together or even lived as people.
    Cox seemed to recover rather quickly once he made it back to Pennsylvania in mid - September, the catatonic Cox that Mitchell said Thorazine could only do so much for had made a "full recovery" while his friend was in a London morgue. To paraphrase a book quote "Billy was always on a plane" back to Memphis implies discord in Jimi's band during the period after Denver Pop until Feb. - Mar.1970, that Hendrix couldn't secure Cox his position gives weight to Cox's assertion that elements in Chandler/Jeffrey didn't want the visual image of the old group broken up ( Burks 1970 JHE interview, "Noel is touring w/ Jeff Beck, he will be back though" someone could not let go of the old band who could it be?).

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackIrish55 View Post
    To paraphrase a book quote "Billy was always on a plane" back to Memphis
    Possibly interesting. Which book, what page? He had already headed back home several times previous to his "breakdown", once when he fell out with Douglas and his sidekick in the studio.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    I think it was Herb Worthington who mentioned that after the Denver Pop festival gig when Noel said that was it and he was off, Jimi was in a bit of a flap about it. Might have been in a UV issue where I read it. Only problem with that is Jimi announced from the stage it was their last gig. I think Noel (the whole band probably) saw the writing on the wall and the end of the band was an unspoken understanding/realisation over several months. The Experience didn't record during that final tour. Billy had been on the scene since April too after all. Noel maybe came up with a story to save face a bit about Jimi telling the press he intended to expand the band, but he was probably genuinely upset about it. He said in interviews that he'd had enough and couldn't handle it anymore - the whole scene generally. I doubt Jimi ever actually sacked Noel. He apparently didn't even let Noel know that he was sticking with Billy for the Spring 70 tour. Noel flew to NY assuming it was all on.

    I think it was the same deal with Buddy leaving the BOG. I tend to believe Trixie when she said management had to do Jimi's dirty work and get rid of Buddy. Jimi didn't want to share the band leader role Buddy tried to impose, in my opinion anyway. Other things mentioned in Ultimate Hendrix that Buddy was taking liberties and charging limo service and dental work for family back to band accounts probably didn't help either.

    Jimi didn't want to do the MSG 70 gig and had to be convinced by Jim Marron to go. He picked him up from his apartment and said he was on a bad downer from a coke binge. Quite different than the bad acid from Mike Jeffery story. (Although Noel saw it too apparently). Could well be that Mike saw Jimi's bad condition on arrival (confirmed by Johnny Winter) and wanted to pick Jimi up seeing as he had invested in filming the gig.

    As for Billy saying that the GSAR and BOG were killed of via management, I think the truth lies somewhere in between. I'm sure they wanted the Experience to keep going because it was such a cash cow and they would have made that opinion felt for sure. As for acting on it in such an extreme way via intimidation (target shooting as threats) and spiking Jimi himself to ruin a gig and an excuse to fire the band is a little too hard for me to believe. It's as mad as Mike having Jimi busted for drug possession at Toronto and kidnapping and rescuing him as a show of power. (Not to say Mike was a saint of course - or Bob Levine for that matter). GSAR broke up because it didn't work and they felt the distain from management. That's why Larry and Billy left to make life easier for Jimi. They weren't forced as such as far as I know. There is more to that story though around the Salvation gig and rehearsals Jimi held for new members. BOG ended because Jimi was over it I believe.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by stplsd View Post
    He's changed his tune back and fore over the years Let's not forget, as the story goes, that at the end on the final Fehmarn gig everyone concerned said he was suffering from a breakdown that included paranoia.


    Yeah but you look at all the footage from Isle of Wight through to Fehmarn and Billy does not look paranoid at any point, and those photos of Jimi, Mitch and Billy at an airport I think, front cover of Calling Long Distance, Billy looks as calm and relaxed and normal as ever. IMHO the paranoia was a scam invented so they could cut the tour, so Billy flew back to US, Mitch did his thing and Jimi did his, ending up as we now well know.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by vkd108 View Post
    Billy does not look paranoid at any point,
    So you can diagnose paranoia by just looking at a few photos.


    Quote Originally Posted by vkd108 View Post
    Billy looks as calm and relaxed and normal as ever.
    Check out the photos around the flag pole at Fehmarn then, don't know about 'paranoid' but he doesn't look like Mr. Happy

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by stplsd View Post
    So you can diagnose paranoia by just looking at a few photos.
    Well you can to an extent. An emotionally troubled person (paranoid) will have a facial expression to match as, "The face is the index of the mind."

    And they said he only went on stage at Fehmarn if Stickells acted as his security and stood near him for the whole set. Meanwhile, observing the footage he doesn't appear to be preoccupied with anything, there are no signs of nervousness, hastily looking over his shoulder, etc. He just looks, well, normal. As for Gerry, did you spot him? I didn't.

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    Re: Billy Cox - Vintage Guitar Magazine Interview 1998

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackIrish55 View Post
    To paraphrase a book quote "Billy was always on a plane" back to Memphis implies discord in Jimi's band during the period after Denver Pop until Feb. - Mar.1970, that Hendrix couldn't secure Cox his position gives weight to Cox's assertion that elements in Chandler/Jeffrey didn't want the visual image of the old group broken up ( Burks 1970 JHE interview, "Noel is touring w/ Jeff Beck, he will be back though" someone could not let go of the old band who could it be?).
    In the Johnny Black book Billy said he "came back" at least 4x after his initial sojurn in April 1969.


    Quote Originally Posted by pukaha View Post
    Jimi didn't want to do the MSG 70 gig and had to be convinced by Jim Marron to go. He picked him up from his apartment and said he was on a bad downer from a coke binge. Quite different than the bad acid from Mike Jeffery story. (Although Noel saw it too apparently). Could well be that Mike saw Jimi's bad condition on arrival (confirmed by Johnny Winter) and wanted to pick Jimi up seeing as he had invested in filming the gig.
    The backstage photos that circulate are interesting for ex, the one w/ Jimi and Devon walking where Devon is wearing a long black leather coat, Jimi looks fine and is smiling. There is the one of Buddy looking at something(most likely Jimi) with a wtf? look. The picture of Jimi backstage w/ black Strat in hand heading towards the stage, he looks ominous.
    Last edited by susep73; 03-06-18 at 07:22 PM.

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